2018 Schedule

 

This schedule is subject to – and probably will – change.   Before you come to the festival, please be sure to check back here for any updates.

Printable schedules will be available online shortly before the festival.

Printed schedules will be available at the Town Center, the Yancey Common Times Journal office, and all the Avery-Mitchell-Yancey Libraries shortly before the festival.  Keep in touch!

 

 

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

Poetry Workshop with Sidney Wade, Friday at 9

Non-fiction Workshop with Mallory McDuff, Friday at 2

Memoir Workshop with Joni Tevis, Saturday at 9

Fiction Workshop with Christopher Swann, Saturday at 2


 

Thursday, September 6

7:00 p.m.            

Kane SmegoTown Center Legacy Room

Free performance with National Poetry Slam Artist and Hip Hop Poet

 

Friday, September 7

 

FRI 9-11:45

Workshop: Sidney Wade – Location tba upon registration.
There are ten basic concerns that govern the way I write poetry. In this workshop I will share mine and encourage you to develop your own.
Advance Registration Required – Workshop – $30


 

FRI 9-9:45

Leah WeissFirst Baptist Church

Leah Weiss, bestselling author of If The Creek Don’t Rise, explains her process of creating authentic Appalachian voices. Select readings will highlight the cadence and rhythm of the remote voices we find in the North Carolina mountains close to Burnsville. According to the starred review from Library Journal, Weiss has delivered a “Brilliant First Novel… Writing with a deep knowledge of the enduring myth of Appalachia, Weiss vividly portrays real people and sorrows.” The Kirkus Review called the book “Part gothic, part romance, part heartbreaking Loretta Lynn ballad.” Her words should feel right at home at the literary festival.  Sponsored by Little Switzerland Books and Beans

Terri Kirby EricksonThe Snap Dragon
Terri Kirby Erickson will be reading various poems from her five full-length collections of award-winning poetry, followed by question and answer sessions.  According to author Ruth Moose, “Erickson is our North Carolina ‘Spoon River Anthology.’ She’s got the gift of capturing people on paper as skillfully as any fine portrait artist. Her quick, deft hand pins down the nuances, the quirks, the tell-tale traits that make us who we are…”
Sponsored by Britt Kaufmann & Chad Smoker

Mary Ann ClaudNuWray Inn
Encouraging Words for Late Bloomers
It Ain’t over til the Fat Lady Sings. Sure, I’ve been a published writer for forty years, but I had always wanted to try to write a novel. Well, actually I did write a novel years ago, but like many first novels it was terrible. Too autobiographical, too disorganized, totally unprofessional. It was so bad I threw it away. But I didn’t stop writing and eventually published my first novel when I was seventy-five. It can be done.

FRI 10-10:45    

Jodi Lynn AndersonTown Center Legacy Room
Turning the real into the unreal: How to spin magical stories out of real life
We write stories because we want to let our imaginations roam on the page…but we also want to express feelings that we’ve experienced and moments that have left marks on us. This workshop will hopefully generate ideas on how we can have the best of both worlds in our stories: building characters and plots that feel mythical or magical, but also close to home and heart.
Sponsored by Young & McQueen Grading

Amy Willoughby-BurleToe River Arts Gallery
Love, loss and laughter. Surfacing from the past. Finding the will to Rise.
A reading from The Lemonade Year, with a look at the lives of the characters who populate this novel about love, loss, and second chances. See yourself in their story and embrace your own. Come listen, and share your own story of triumph. We need each other, especially during our lemonade years.

Abigail DeWittYummi Yarns
My mother, who grew up on the coast of Normandy, spent her adolescence under Nazi occupation. Like everyone she knew, she prayed daily for the Allies to liberate France, but while she waited, she tried to live a normal life. On June 4, despite the dangers of traveling during the Occupation, she went to Paris to take an exam. On June 6, the Allies launched the D-day invasion and her childhood home was bombed. Her mother, grandmother, and sister were buried in the rubble. My mother told the D-day story over and over when I was small, but I didn’t grasp how sad it was. I thought it was a story of incredible good luck—what would have happened if she hadn’t gone to Paris to take her exam? It wasn’t until I was an adult that I understood that her telling and re-telling was an attempt to make sense of her own survival and the loss of her family. My novel, News of Our Loved Ones, is my attempt to make sense of my family’s history. What does it mean to lose so much just as you are being saved? And how does anyone survive what seems unbearable? Writing fiction helps me understand the world, so I created a cast of characters who endured what my relatives endured and I let each one tell her version of the story.
Sponsored by Something Special Gift Shop/Monkey Business Toy Shop

Daren WangThe Snap Dragon
The Hidden Light of Northern Fires
A novel rooted in the remarkable, but little-known, true history of the only secessionist town north of the Mason Dixon Line.
When escaped slave Joe Bell collapses in her father’s barn, Mary Willis must ward off Confederate guerrillas and spies, Joe’s vengeful owner, and even her own brother to help the handsome fugitive cross to freedom. Mary has always been an outcast, an outspoken abolitionist woman in a town of bounty hunters and anti-Union farmers. Helping runaways is the only thing that makes her life in Town Line bearable. As the countryside is riled by the drumbeat of civil war and the promise of an extravagant bounty for the wounded fugitive, Mary finds herself drawn to the stranger in forbidden ways. When rebels cross from nearby Canada intent on killing him, they bring the devastation of the brutal war to the town and the farm, and threaten to destroy all that Mary loves.

Harriett Hill and H’Yoanh Ksor Buonya Nu Wray Inn
Escaping Viet Nam
A Memoir of Determination, Defiance and Deliverance
This riveting account of danger, starvation, strength and endurance is accompanied by powerful and unshakable faith.
Sponsored by George and Katherine Nero

FRI 11-11:45    

Jodi Lynn AndersonTown Center Legacy Room
Turning the real into the unreal: How to spin magical stories out of real life
We write stories because we want to let our imaginations roam on the page…but we also want to express feelings that we’ve experienced and moments that have left marks on us. This workshop will hopefully generate ideas on how we can have the best of both worlds in our stories: building characters and plots that feel mythical or magical, but also close to home and heart.
Sponsored by Young & McQueen Grading

Sam Barbee– Yummi Yarns
Sam Barbee will read from his collection That Rain We Needed (Press 53, 2016); and also poems from his new chapbook, Book of Uncommon Prayer , travel poems written while in England.

Bryant SimonToe River Arts Gallery
Hamlet Fire
In this talk and reading, based on his most recent book, The Hamlet Fire, award-winning historian Bryant Simon will examine the causes and consequences of North Carolina’s deadliest industrial accident. On the morning of September 3, 1991, Imperial Food Products, makers of chicken tenders and nuggets, burst into flames. Twenty-five people perished that morning behind the plant’s locked and –double-bolted doors. In his bracing social autopsy of the town, the state, and the nation, Simon shows how cheap government, cheap labor, and cheap food have become the new American norm in the 1980s and essentially triggered the tragedy in Hamlet and how they remain the dominant ethos today in North Carolina and across the country.

Debra Frasier – First Baptist Church
Debra Frasier, award-winning author and illustrator, will give a lively presentation with pictures and stories about how a children’s book grows from a tiny seed-of-an-idea into a hardcover book. She will include her beloved classic picture, On the Day You Were Born, the Oprah Summer Reading List Pick, Miss Alaineus (“miscellaneous’), A Vocabulary Disaster, and SPIKE, Ugliest Dog in the Universe, a Kirkus starred review dog-story favorite. Every family will receive a free book. (On Saturday, Debra will also appear at 1:00 pm on the Town Square as her character, The AmaZing Alphabetini. Look for the red tent Saturday, and come discover YOUR Word-of-Power. All ages.)

 

FRI 12-12:30    

Book Signing – Morning Authors

FRI 12:30-2       

BREAK FOR LUNCH

FRI 2-4:45 

Workshop: Mallory McDuffLocation tba upon registration.
Writing about place: The power of crafting and publishing stories that honor the places we love
From a cow pasture in Western North Carolina to the urban landscapes of Atlanta, Georgia, place is more than a backdrop in our lives. Among many roles, place can be a setting, a character, and a source of conflict in our stories. Writing about the places where we live, work, learn, and play also can serve to honor and protect such areas. In this workshop, we will examine the importance of place among diverse forms of writing in creative nonfiction, from personal essays to op-ed pieces; experiment with using the structure of several “masters” of placed-based writing as models; and identify venues for publishing our work. We will also look at the power of storytelling about place to advocate for personal and collective changes that conserve the places we call home. Of note, this craft workshop will include some time outside!
Advance Registration Required – Workshop – $30

 

FRI 2-2:45

Gail GodwinTown Center Legacy Room
The eponymous structure at the heart of Godwin’s seventeenth novel stands, barely, on a small South Carolina Island. Abandoned for fifty years after a hurricane swept away the family that lived there, the cottage has become a muse of sorts for Charlotte, a painter who feels it mirrors  her own ruined life. When Charlotte becomes the caretaker of her orphaned nephew, the lonely eleven-year-old is also drawn to the cottage, where he finds a companion in the ghost of the boy who once lived there. Exploring various kinds of haunting, Godwin, whose distinguished career began with The Perfectionists in 1970 and has included acclaimed books such FloraFather Melancholy’s Daughter and the memoir PUBLISHING delves into the ways memory, place, and art can shape lives.

Shuly CawoodFirst Baptist Church
“Detours and Back-Up Plans: Life Lessons of a Writer”  The path to becoming a writer is often not straight or simple, but its complexities are what provide some of the best lessons. During this talk, Shuly Cawood will share stories—about overcoming rejection, facing fears, and finding forgiveness, along with many other life lessons—during her journey to becoming the author of the memoir, The Going and Goodbye.   Sponsored by Dr. & Mrs. Olin Sansbury

FRI 3-3:45          

Lillah SchwartzTown Center Legacy Room
Living Well with Yoga: It’s as easy as 1-2-3.
Join Lillah for a 45 minute presentation to explore the Three Yoga Keys for pain free living. Lillah shares research based knowledge and her 35 years of experience to demonstrate to you the true therapeutic benefits of yoga. You will learn how rhythm, breath, length and space create physical and mental ease. Wear loose comfortable clothing so you can stretch…! We will use chairs as a yoga prop for finding stability.

Daniel PierceToe River Arts Gallery
Hazel Creek: The Life and Death of an Iconic Mountain Community
An exploration of one of the most iconic watersheds in the Southern Appalachian region, focal point of the infamous Road to Nowhere controversy, research subject for Horace Kephart’s classic work Our Southern Highlanders, and the haven of legendary moonshiners, trout fishermen, and bear hunters.
Sponsored by Garden Deli/Snap Dragon

David Brill – Yummi Yarns
Into the Mist: Tales of Death and Disaster, Mishaps and Misdeeds, Misfortune and Mayhem in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Between 1931 and 2013, 468 persons lost their lives in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Author David Brill’s new book, Into the Mist, chronicles some of those tragedies, as well as several epic storm events and heroic rescues. Brill will discuss the book and read from its 13 chapters, which depict men and women in extreme situations, struggling against brutal and often deadly adversity.

FRI 4-4:45      

Book Buzz – NuWray Inn
Rant and rave about the books that you really like and really hate. Book lovers of all stripes and dots can add their two cents to the enthusiastic discussion. What’s not to like about getting the chance to spout off about your favorite books and pick up a few recommendations for more?

 John Carroll WhitenerFirst Baptist Church

 Don’t Ask and I Will Tell
John Carroll Whitener will read an excerpt from his book, Don’t Ask and I Will Tell: Finding Myself in Vietnam, which chronicles life in an Army clinic during the war in Vietnam. He will discuss stories behind the diary entries in context of the 1960s and 70s and how some things never change while others have evolved by light years.   He will also share answers from his interview on North Carolina Public Radio’s “The State of things with Frank Stacio.”

John KesselToe River Arts Gallery
“The Future as Mirror: How SF Uses Tomorrow to Understand Today”
Science fiction is popularly understood to be about showing us the world of the future: space travel, robots, immortality, encounters with aliens, mechanized cities, human evolution. But in fact much science fiction, though it may be set a hundred or a thousand years from now, is as much about the present as it is about times to come. Both consciously and unconsciously, the futures science fiction writers present arise from and comment on the way things are today, often with the goal of changing the present or even preventing the future.

Joni Tevis – Yummi Yarns
Formerly a park ranger, factory worker, and seller of cemetery plots, Joni Tevis is the author of two books of essays, The Wet Collection: A Field Guide to Iridescence and Memory, and The World Is On Fire: Scrap, Treasure, and Songs of Apocalypse. Now she teaches creative writing at Furman University in Greenville, SC. She will read recent work about ghost towns, tourist traps, and atomic dread.

FRI 5-5:30          

Book Signing – Afternoon Authors  

FRI 7:00               

Banquet with Michael W. Twitty

 The Cooking Gene: Tracing My African American Story Through Food
For African American culinary historian Michael W. Twitty there was a giant hole in the story of American cooking as big as the one in the story of most African American families. Putting the microscope on himself, Michael decided to fully trace out his family history through the story of Southern and American food. Using genetic research, historic interpretation, nature study, heirloom gardening and interviews with contemporary voices in food, his journey led him back to his family’s origins in West and Central Africa and a front ring seat in the debate over race and food in American life.
 Sponsored by Bubba and Susan Crutchfield
Banquet – $35 BYOB

 

SORRY – Sold Out

 

Saturday, September 7

 

SAT 9-11:45      

Workshop: Joni Tevis – Location tba upon registration.
Work Experience as Memoir Material
This workshop will take participants through a series of brainstorming and generating exercises as a way to help them draw out details from work experiences, details that may lead into the creation of a longer nonfiction narrative.
Advance Registration Required – Workshop – $30

 

SAT 9-9:45

Amy Willoughby-BurleTown Center Legacy Room
Lemons to Lemonade: Finding the balance between what you expected and what life delivered.
Often, we’re so mired down by life’s disappointments and heartaches that we can’t see the beauty around us. Life doesn’t always go the way we wanted it to, but if we’re willing to look for happiness, it’s there A reading from The Lemonade Year, a novel about second chances and a discussion about love, loss, laughter, and the search for happiness.

Christopher SwannNuWray Inn
The Shadow of the Past
Christopher Swann will discuss his debut novel, Shadow of the Lions, as well as his lifelong interest in mysteries and its influence on his fiction.  He will also answer audience questions about his novel, writing, and publishing.

David BrillThe Snap Dragon
As Far As the Eye Can See
“There were days when I ambled along the trail feeling like a man floating on the breeze through a boundless garden. Other days, the trees melded into two green labyrinthine walls that contained and guided me, and my mind traced other trails, scattered with people and events drawn from my past.”
For most Appalachian Trail thru-hikers, physical and spiritual awakening occurs en route and endures through a lifetime. As Far As the Eye Can See recounts Brill’s AT journey of the late 1970s and notes the significant role the mountains of North Carolina played in his own awakening.
Along 2,100 miles and across 14 states, Brill and the thousands of other men and women who have followed the AT’s white blazes ultimately discover that the life one left behind is far less defining than the one that stretches ahead.

SAT 10-10:45

Chantel AcevedoTown Center Legacy Room
Writing Fiction from Memory–A Generative Mini-workshop
In this session, attendees will delve into memories, stretch them, and mash them up in order to create new work of fiction. We will be writing several pieces together, as time allows, so attendees should bring paper/pens and/or laptops and be ready to create.

Mary Ann ClaudYummi Yarns
The Second Time Around. Or: Writing the Dreaded Second Novel.
You’d think it would be easy, wouldn’t you? At least easier than that first one. Think again. Take a look on the internet and you will find out differently. One writer describes the experience as trying to build the Eiffel Tower out of jello and tooth picks while blindfolded. Come talk with me about making the process a little easier.

Bryant SimonThe Snap Dragon
Historian at Work:
The Washington Post praised The Hamlet Fire as “captivating and brilliantly conceived.” Booklist called it “engaging and humanizing.”  And the Hollywood Reporter listed it as a “must read” book the for fall of 2017.  In this session, author Bryant Simon talks about the research behind The Hamlet Fire and the decisions he made to tell the story the way he did.

Abigail DeWittNuWray Inn
The Uses of Sensory Detail
Fiction, memoir, and poetry depend on sensory detail. The smell of a cookie, the taste of a plum, and the sight of children playing in a creek have triggered some of our greatest masterpieces. Join us to see how a few simple sensory-based exercises can deepen and strengthen your own writing. We’ll talk about how to develop a stronger sensory awareness; the best ways to describe what you see, taste, smell, hear, and touch; and how focusing on sensory detail keeps us honest even when we’re making things up. Finally, we’ll see how a single detail can answer a multitude of questions about character development, plot, and meaning. Everyone is welcome—this is a mini-workshop for beginners and experienced writers alike. All you need are paper and a pen or pencil for a short in-class exercise.
Sponsored by Something Special Gift Shop/Monkey Business Toy Shop

SAT 11-11:45   

Chantel AcevedoTown Center Legacy Room
All Shapes and Sizes–Plotting Your Novel
This session will present strategies for plotting a novel still in the early stages, using back cover copy as a model. Attendees should bring paper/pens and/or a laptop in order to generate some ideas.

Daniel PierceToe River Arts Gallery
Hazel Creek: The Life and Death of an Iconic Mountain Community
An exploration of one of the most iconic watersheds in the Southern Appalachian region, focal point of the infamous Road to Nowhere controversy, research subject for Horace Kephart’s classic work Our Southern Highlanders, and the haven of legendary moonshiners, trout fishermen, and bear hunters.
Sponsored by Garden Deli/Snap Dragon

Leah Weiss – Nu Wray Inn
Leah Weiss, bestselling author of If The Creek Don’t Rise, explains her process of creating authentic Appalachian voices. Select readings will highlight the cadence and rhythm of the remote voices we find in the North Carolina mountains close to Burnsville. According to the starred review from Library Journal, Weiss has delivered a “Brilliant First Novel… Writing with a deep knowledge of the enduring myth of Appalachia, Weiss vividly portrays real people and sorrows.” The Kirkus Review called the book “Part gothic, part romance, part heartbreaking Loretta Lynn ballad.” Her words should feel right at home at the literary festival.   Sponsored by Little Switzerland Books and Beans

Sam BarbeeThe Snap Dragon
Sam Barbee will read from his collection That Rain We Needed (Press 53, 2016); and also poems from his new chapbook, Book of Uncommon Prayer , travel poems written while in England.

Debra Frasier – First Baptist Church
Debra Frasier, award-winning author and illustrator, will give a lively presentation with pictures and stories about how a children’s book grows from a tiny seed-of-an-idea into a hardcover book. She will include her beloved classic picture, On the Day You Were Born, the Oprah Summer Reading List Pick, Miss Alaineus (“miscellaneous’), A Vocabulary Disaster, and SPIKE, Ugliest Dog in the Universe, a Kirkus starred review dog-story favorite. Every family will receive a free book. (Debra will also appear at 1:00 pm on the Town Square as her character, The AmaZing Alphabetini. Look for the red tent and come discover YOUR Word-of-Power. All ages.)

SAT 12-12:30   

Book Signing – Morning Authors

SAT 12:30-2       BREAK FOR LUNCH

 

SAT 1-4:45   The AmaZing Alphabetini – Town Square

All ages are invited to step in and watch how Letters make Words.  Pick 3 cards which will lead you to the Golden Box of Wise Words and find YOUR word that will help you grow into a more powerful YOU in the coming year.  IT’S MAGIC !

 

SAT 2-4:45

Workshop: Christopher Swann – Location tba upon registration.
“Write What You Know, and Make Up the Rest”
Chris will speak with attendees about his own journey as a writer, from dream to vision to publication, as well as his take on the popular writing advice “write what you know.”  He will offer advice on how to draw from your own life experiences and when to make up the rest.  Attendees will participate in short creative writing exercises and share with each other—please bring your own paper and pen/pencil or laptop.
Advance Registration Required – Workshop – $30

 

SAT 2-2:45         

Brothers Like TheseTown Center Legacy Room
Brothers Like These is comprised of stories and poems by Vietnam combat veterans and is also collected in a book of the same name, published by St. Andrews University Press, and is its current best-seller. It was performed twice as a staged reading at Asheville Community Theater and also at Appalachian State University. Brothers Like These evolved from the creative writing program that began in 2014 in a basement room, Classroom B, at the Charles George VA Medical Center in Asheville, where the Brothers gathered every Wednesday – and where that work still continues. The sessions were directed by Joseph Bathanti, a professor of creative writing at Appalachian State and Dr. Bruce Kelly, a primary care physician at the VA. Those sessions yielded extraordinary writing, an enduring testimony to the veterans’ sacred sense of community, love, and brotherhood. These are stories and poems, large and small, funny and heartbreaking, that only these men can relate in their own inimitable styles – stories and poems not just invaluable to succeeding generations of soldiers, but to every citizen of our country, and beyond. A handful of the Brothers will deliver readings from Brothers Like These.

Shuly Cawood – First Baptist Church
“Detours and Back-Up Plans: Life Lessons of a Writer”    The path to becoming a writer is often not straight or simple, but its complexities are what provide some of the best lessons. During this talk, Shuly Cawood will share stories—about overcoming rejection, facing fears, and finding forgiveness, along with many other life lessons—during her journey to becoming the author of the memoir, The Going and Goodbye.
Sponsored by Dr. & Mrs. Olin Sansbury                                   

Mallory McDuffYummi Yarns
Restoration Grief: Forging connections through writing about loss
Loss is a part of life, but that doesn’t make it easier to handle, especially in a culture that pays more attention to gains. Writing creates a public arena for talking about grief, including the loss of both people and places in our lives. This session explores the intersections created by the author’s experiences that began with a cross-country road trip to document stories of churches caring for creation and ended with a memoir about her parents, who integrated faith with sustainability by giving up trash for Lent and planning their own natural burial.
As a mother, teacher, and writer, Mallory McDuff will share the unanticipated connections created from writing her two nonfiction books, “Natural Saints” (OUP, 2010) and “Sacred Acts” (New Society Publishers, 2012), as well as from a memoir-in-progress about the lives and deaths of her parents.

 

Tamra Wilson – Toe River Arts Gallery   What makes a Southern Story Southern?

Southern stories are more than tangled tales of honeysuckle and kudzu. The thirteen states that comprise the Old South have collectively produced some of the nation’s finest writers and and many of America’s most honored books.  While some insist that “authentic” Southern stories must include a dead mule, Tamra Wilson begs to differ. In this presentation she will share from her own research the six essentials that define Southern fiction and memoir.

You’ll never look at Southern literature quite the same way again.

 

 

SAT 3:-3:45    

Book Buzz – NuWray Inn
Rant and rave about the books that you really like and really hate. Book lovers of all stripes and dots can add their two cents to the enthusiastic discussion. What’s not to like about getting the chance to spout off about your favorite books and pick up a few recommendations for more?

John Carroll WhitenerToe River Arts Gallery
Don’t Ask and I Will Tell
John Carroll Whitener will read an excerpt from his book, Don’t Ask and I Will Tell: Finding Myself in Vietnam, which chronicles life in an Army clinic during the war in Vietnam. He will discuss stories behind the diary entries in context of the 1960s and 70s and how some things never change while others have evolved by light years.   He will also share answers from his interview on North Carolina Public Radio’s “The State of things with Frank Stacio.”

Sidney WadeYummi Yarns
Sidney Wade will read from her most recent collection of poems, “Bird Book,” and several others. Of “Bird Book,” poet Mark Jarman writes, “Supple and airy . . . durable and colorful . . reminds us of the sonic closeness of the words “bird” and “bard.” These are poems of wit, surprise, elegance, joy, and a sense of the marvelous. They take flight.”

SAT 4-4:45

John KesselToe River Arts Gallery
John Kessel reads from his novel Pride and Prometheus. “Pride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics.

Terri Kirby EricksonFirst Baptist Church
Terri Kirby Erickson will be reading various poems from her five full-length collections of award-winning poetry, followed by question and answer sessions.  According to author Ruth Moose, “Erickson is our North Carolina ‘Spoon River Anthology.’ She’s got the gift of capturing people on paper as skillfully as any fine portrait artist. Her quick, deft hand pins down the nuances, the quirks, the tell-tale traits that make us who we are…”
Sponsored by Britt Kaufmann & Chad Smoker

Daren WangYummi Yarns
The Hidden Light of Northern Fires
A novel rooted in the remarkable, but little-known, true history of the only secessionist town north of the Mason Dixon Line. When escaped slave Joe Bell collapses in her father’s barn, Mary Willis must ward of Confederate guerrillas and spies, Joe’s vengeful owner, and even her own brother to help the handsome fugitive cross to freedom. Mary has always been an outcast, an outspoken abolitionist woman in a town of bounty hunters and anti-Union farmers. Helping runaways is the only thing that makes her life in Town Line bearable. As the countryside is riled by the drumbeat of civil war and the promise of an extravagant bounty for the wounded fugitive, Mary finds herself drawn to the stranger in forbidden ways. When rebels cross from nearby Canada intent on killing him, they bring the devastation of the brutal war to the town and the farm, and threaten to destroy all that Mary loves.

Harriet HillNuWray Inn
For the Love of Robert
After a loved one, especially a child, leaves this earth unexpectedly, how does one incorporate grief, sadness, forgiveness, hope, acceptance and joy into the days and years ahead? There is no right or wrong way.  Sponsored by George and Katherine Nero

SAT 5-5:30         

Book Signing – Afternoon Authors

SAT 6:30                                

Keynote with Gail Godwin

My keynote speech, “The Desperate Place,” examines that place in your psyche where you find yourself embedded in a situation that is yours alone and that you may be powerless to change. I am composing it to honor the festival’s theme of “Surface and Rise.”  Photo: Dion Ogust
Keynote – $20