2016 Schedule

Please note that the schedule is subject to – and probably will – change. We recommend that you check the website for updates and visit the Welcome Desk at the festival.

For a printable schedule, please click here.

On-line and PO Box ticket sales ended on August 31st.  Tickets for the Saturday Night Keynote ($20) and The Non-fiction Workshop with Jennifer McGaha ($30) may be purchased at the Burnsville Town Center, M-F 10-1p.m. and at the Festival.

On the days of the festival, last-minute changes will be posted on the window at festival headquarters, the Burnsville Town Center, 6 S. Main Street.  Latest change:  Terry Roberts, author of A Short Time to Stay Here and – just published – That Bright Land has joined this year’s roster.
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THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 8

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Photo by RL Geyer

6:30 pm
Town Center Legacy Room
FREE CONCERT AND DISCUSSION
WAYFARING STRANGERS: A MUSICAL VOYAGE FROM SCOTLAND TO ULSTER TO APPALACHIA
Authors and musicians Doug Orr and Darcy Orr will give a concert and discussion based on their 2016 Thomas Wolfe Award Winning Book.

Fiona_studio_RS-SF IMG_9766Via audiolink from her home in Scotland, they will be joined by Fiona Ritchie, co-author and host of NPR’s “Thistle and Shamrock.”   Orr and Ritchie spent years researching ballads across generations and oceans.  Photo by Roy Summers/Scottish Field.
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FRIDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 9

9-11:45
Advance Registration Required – $30  Sorry–SOLD OUT
MEMOIR WORKSHOP – CHRISTINE HALE
Sponsored by George and Katherine Nero
Journey In: Seeking Your Own True Story
Hale will use brief portions of participants’ manuscripts, excerpts of published creative nonfiction and (time permitting) writing prompts to teach techniques for generating vivid material, structuring it engagingly, and strategically handling what can’t be know or can’t be revealed.  Participants should submit up to 7 pages of manuscript in draft – – work which they intend to revise.  These must be typed double-spaced in 12-point standard font (Calibri, Arial, Times New Roman) with 1-inch margins on all sides and must be submitted to Hale in hard copy by mail no later than August 1 and after that by email.  Addresses will be provided upon registration. Participants should understand that, because of time constraint, only a portion of their submission will be shared with the class, as a basis for discussion.
Sorry–SOLD OUT

Friday 9-9:45
Town Center Legacy Room
CHAD ROHL
Mini Comics & More!
While sharing this one-of-a-kind graphic novel, Heavy Sketches, participants will have a chance to get their own creative ideas on paper. From creating their own comics, writing short stories or inspiring up and coming illustrators and writers to think outside the box, this session is jam packed with engaging activities.

Friday 9-9:45
Town Center Area C
JIM AUCHMUTEY The boy who wouldn’t fight back
Greg Wittkamper wasn’t just bullied in high school; he was persecuted. He came from Koinonia, a controversial Christian commune near Americus, Ga. Now known as the birthplace of Habitat for Humanity, the community was once bombed and boycotted for its commitment to racial equality.  As the only Koinonia kid at Americus High the year it was forced to desegregate, Greg was shunned, spit on, even assaulted.  But he refused to retaliate. Four decades later, some of Greg’s classmates who had never forgotten the way he was mistreated tracked him down in West Virginia and wrote him letters of apology, inviting him back to Georgia for their reunion. It was the journey he had always wanted – and dreaded. Join journalist Jim Auchmutey as he discusses and reads from The Class of ’65, a true story of race, religion and reconciliation in the South.

Friday 9-9:45
First Baptist Church
JAMES McTEER 
McTeer will read from his award-winning Lowcountry novel, MINNOW, and offer insight into the inspiration, work, and process that went into its creation and publication. The history, culture, and natural world of the Lowcountry — and his grandfather’s voodoo roots — will also be a topic of discussion.  The session will end with an audience-led Q&A.

Friday 9-9:45
TRAC Gallery
PASCKIE PASCUA
A reading of choice poems from his book, Red is the Color of my Night, followed by a Q & A.

Friday 10-10:45
Town Center Legacy Room
SARO LYNCH-THOMASON
“Jenny’s Gone Away: Songs of Coming and Going in Appalachia”
This multimedia performance will present songs, narratives and images from the long legacy of Appalachia as a place of migrations. Despite it’s long-held representation as a region stuck in time, Appalachia has been witness to many different travelers coming into the region to find work or liberation, and leaving again for the same reasons. Using participatory song “Jenny’s Gone Away” will explore some of these histories- From southern sharecroppers looking for employment in West Virginia coal mines, to Shakers looking for a spiritual Eden in Kentucky and to WWII-era Appalachians looking for opportunities in cities like Detroit and Chicago. Come sing through this performance and learn a thing or two!

Friday 10-10:45
First Baptist Church
LEIGH ANN HENION – A Conversation
Join us for a Q&A with Leigh Ann Henion, author of the New York Times bestseller Phenomenal: A Hesitant Adventurer’s Search for Wonder in the Natural World.  In this session, Henion will share the improbable story of how a Washington Post Magazine assignment about the monarch butterfly migration inspired her to chase eclipses, auroras, and other natural phenomena around the globe to reawaken her sense of wonder.

Friday 10-10:45
Town Hall Upstairs
ILLUSTRATOR PANELThe Artist’s Approach to Story
Join three artists who will share images of their work and discuss their use of design and illustration in creating books.
Kevin Watson of Press 53, who publishes poetry and short fiction collections, and reprints classic NC novels, will share how he conceptualizes the overall design of his books, from the interior to the cover art. Writer and illustrator Lauren Faulkenberry, who creates artist books through letterpress printing, will discuss ways she creates images through traditional printmaking methods and how they can be translated into digital books. Children’s author Ellie Kirby will share her process of making illustrations and text work together to tell a story. She’ll also describe how she illustrates traditional Appalachian tales with watercolor paintings that feature local scenery and people. Presentations are followed by Q and A.

Friday 11-11:45
Town Center Legacy Room
BEN MONTGOMERY Lecture and reading, followed by Q&AThe Life and Legend of Grandma Gatewood.  
Montgomery explores the amazing story of the eccentric grandmother who overcame decades of abuse and became the first woman to solo thru-hike the Appalachian Trail.

Friday 11-11:45
TC AREA C
CHAD ROHL Mini Comics & More!
While sharing this one-of-a-kind graphic novel, Heavy Sketches, participants will have a chance to get their own creative ideas on paper.  From creating their own comics, writing short stories or inspiring up and coming illustrators and writers to think outside the box, this session is jam packed with engaging activities.

Friday 11-11:45
First Baptist Church
MARIA INGRAM BRAUCHT  –Travels Unveiled
A backwoods bred Kernersville girl listens to the call of gypsies from the bottom of a water well, and grows up to realize that wandering is her passion.  Other worlds, other cultures lured her not as a tourist, but as a pilgrim, infusing those foreign ways into the treasured southern country background of her own.  Her poems take us from home to exotic places and back home again.
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FRIDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 9

12-12:30
Town Center Legacy Room
Book-signing: Morning authors and banquet speaker FRED CHAPPELL

12:30-2:00 Break for lunch
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Friday 2-4:45
Advance Registration Required – $30  Sorry–SOLD OUT
FICTION WORKSHOP – MARJORIE KLEIN
Stretching the Truth: Creating Fiction from Life
Our lives are a kaleidoscope of memories.  In this workshop, those memories will be refracted through the prism of imagination to create their fictional counterparts. With the freedom that fiction allows, what was once fixed in fact can be set loose to roam wherever we wish. We’ll start each exercise by free-writing from a prompt that will trigger recollection. That memory will serve as a base for the second part of the exercise to take it into the realm of fiction. While truth can be stranger than fiction, what arises through our creative subconscious from what we assumed were cold hard facts can often reveal a greater truth.
Sorry–SOLD OUT

Friday 2-2:45
Town Center Legacy Room
KRISTA BREMER A Tender Struggle (reading and discussion) 
Bremer will read from her memoir A Tender Struggle, which Elizabeth Gilbert calls “A bold piece of writing (and thinking) by an incredibly brave woman.” After her reading she will answer questions and discuss intimacy, Islam, community – and any other subject that arises from her reading.

Friday 2-2:45
First Baptist Church
CINDY HENRY McMAHON Finding Home in the Mountains—Fresh Water from Old Wells
Cindy Henry McMahon’s family moved to the South Toe Valley when she was ten years old, surviving family violence, fire, flood, poisonous mushrooms, and an ice-cold outhouse. Join Cindy for a reading and discussion of her Yancey-steeped memoir, Fresh Water from Old Wells.  In this session, she will trace her turbulent family’s path to the mountains, highlighting the gifts and healing they discovered when they settled here.

Friday 2-2:45
TRAC Gallery
NICKOLE BROWN 
A reading with Nickole Brown from the Weatherford Award-winning Fanny Says, a biography-in-poems of Brown’s sassy, tough-as-new-rope Kentucky grandmother.

Friday 2-2:45
Town Hall Upstairs
JENNIFER McGAHAChickens and Dogs and Goats, Oh, My!
Marley and Me, Seabiscuit, All Creatures Great and Small. We all love a good animal story. But what exactly makes a good animal story? How do we convey our love for animals without being too sappy, without romanticizing them, without reducing them to flat characters on the page? And, most importantly, how can our animal stories lead to greater insights into what we think and feel and believe?  McGaha will read her own tales of pregnant goats and runaway dogs and chickens with exceptional fortitude, and will discuss techniques for writing your way to a greater understanding of what the animals in your life mean to you.

Friday 3-3:45
Town Center Area C
JULIA FRANKSWomen, Witches, and the End of Time
Julia Franks on the creative process, especially the alchemy of regional history, folklore, personal experience, and current events that contributed to the writing of Over the Plain Houses, her novel set in Western North Carolina in the 1930s, when reformers and government workers streamed into the region.

Friday 3-3:45
First Baptist Church
SALLIE BISSELL 
Bissell, author of seven novels, explores how human beings have been hard-wired for story since our caveman days.  She discusses how story changes our brains and how readers link to writers in surprisingly intimate ways.

Friday 3-3:45
TRAC Gallery
JOSEPH MILLS Book Wandering, A Poetry Reading
Joseph Mills will read from several of his poetry collections including Exit, pursued by a bear which consists of poems triggered by Shakespeare stage directions, Sending Christmas Cards to Huck and Hamlet about a life spent moving into and out of books, and This Miraculous Turning which chronicles the journey of being a white born-and-bred Northerner raising black born-and-bred Southerners.

Friday 3-3:45
Town Hall Upstairs
JODI RHODEN Food and Memoir: a Hands-on Workshop with Cake Lady and Author Jodi Rhoden
Participants will explore memory and metaphor through food and writing with Asheville-based Cake Lady and author of Cake Ladies: Celebrating a Southern Tradition.  There will be cake!

Friday 3-3:45
NuWray Inn Upstairs Parlor
BOOK CLUB BUZZ  book buzz photo2016At the Book Buzz we get to rant and rave about the books that we really like and even hate. Book lovers of all stripes and dots can add their two cents to the enthusiastic discussion. What’s not to like about getting the chance to spout out about your favorite books and pick up a few recommendations for more?

Friday 4-4:45
TRAC (Toe River Arts Council Gallery)
ELLEN MALPHRUS Untying the Moon (Reading, Discussion, Q&A) 
Join Ellen for a brief sampling of passages from her critically acclaimed debut novel and a lively discussion of her mentors Pat Conroy and James Dickey, followed by Q&A. Untying the Moon (foreword by Pat Conroy) is part restless road trip and part passage home to the Carolina Lowcountry – the journey out and the journey in.

Friday 4-4:45
Town Center Legacy Room
JUBAL TINER  
Tiner will read the story “10 Watts,” from his collection The Waterhouse, which follows the character Copper Gale from a small 10 Watt high school radio station in Labette, Oklahoma, as he journeys to a job as a disc jockey in Colorado. During the physical trip, Copper reflects on his past, drinks a lot of coffee and listens to 80’s rock and roll. Replete with lyrics and rendered in sound bytes, this is a reading not to miss. Q and A to follow.

Friday 4-4:45
First Baptist Church
FRED CHAPPELLReadings: A Carnival of Animals, Familiars and other unpublished poems.

Friday 4-4:45
NuWray Inn Upstairs Parlor
RONNI LUNDYRoutes and Routes
A conversation with cookbook author and foodwriter Ronni Lundy examining what Appalachian foodways can tell us about how we got to the southern mountains and where we’re going.

Friday 4-4:45
Town Center Area C
TERRY ROBERTSFact and Fancy: Using Historical Research to Craft a Novel  Join Roberts as he reads and discusses his most recent novel, That Bright Land, set in the summer of 1866, in the aftermath of the Civil War.  Roberts will explore how his historical research into life in Western North Carolina in the years after the war fed the creative process that resulted in the novel.

 

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Friday 5-5:30
Town Center Legacy Room
Book-signing:  Afternoon authors and banquet speaker FRED CHAPPELL

Friday 7:00 p.m. – $35 & B.Y.O.B

Town Center Legacy Room
Fred ChappellBanquet with Fred Chappell

FRED CHAPPELL is the author of a dozen books of verse, two story collections, and eight novels. A native of Canton in the mountains of western North Carolina, he taught at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for over 40 years. He is the winner of, among other awards, the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, Aiken Taylor Prize, T. S. Eliot Prize, and Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Prize seven times over. He was the Poet Laureate of North Carolina from 1997-2002.

Sorry–SOLD OUT

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SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 10

9-11:45
Advance Registration Required – $30
NONFICTION/MEMOIR WORKSHOP – JENNIFER McGAHA
What is that story that nags at you, the one that keeps you up at night, the one you haven’t yet dared to share? And how might telling it transform you? Writing a memoir or a story, one that matters to you, takes courage. When you send your work out into the world, you risk judgement. You risk ridicule. You risk offending people, and you risk being misunderstood. Nonetheless, there are some stories that demand to be told. In this session, we will discuss what it means to write with abandon, to go out on a limb and begin writing the stories that matter most to you. After looking at examples of gutsy prose, we will complete short writing exercises designed to get you writing. Finally, brave and willing participants will be invited to share their responses.

Saturday 9-9:45
Town Hall Upstairs
SALLIE BISSELL 
Bissell, author of seven novels, explores how human beings have been hard-wired for story since our caveman days. She discusses how story changes our brains and how readers link to writers in surprisingly intimate ways.

Saturday 9-9:45
First Baptist Church
CHRISTINE HALE
Hale will read from her new book, A Piece of Sky, A Grain of Rice: A Memoir in Four Meditations, and talk about the process by which she created a kaleidoscopic narrative from multiple threads of childhood memory, family history, and spiritual contemplation.

Saturday 9-9:45
NuWray Inn Upstairs Parlor
RONNI LUNDY – Routes and Routes
A conversation with cookbook author and foodwriter Ronni Lundy examining what Appalachian foodways can tell us about how we got to the southern mountains and where we’re going.

Saturday 9-9:45
Town Center Area C
TERRY ROBERTSFact and Fancy: Using Historical Research to Craft a Novel  Join Roberts as he reads and discusses his most recent novel, That Bright Land, set in the summer of 1866, in the aftermath of the Civil War.  Roberts will explore how his historical research into life in Western North Carolina in the years after the war fed the creative process that resulted in the novel.

Saturday 10-10:45
First Baptist Church
KRISTA BREMER Love and Struggle (a discussion)
Krista Bremer, the author of the memoir A Tender Struggle, will discuss intimacy, faith, and the challenges and opportunities of a bi-cultural marriage. Bremer, who is married to a Libyan-born Muslim, will also discuss why she believes that every marriage is bi-cultural.

Saturday 10-10:45
TC Area C
MARJORIE KLEIN I’m Not Making This Up (But I Am)- Transforming Experience into Fiction-Reading – followed by Q&A.
Using examples from her writing, Marjorie will match them with the real-life experiences that inspired her to turn them into fiction.

Saturday 10-10:45
Town Center Legacy Room
SARO LYNCH-THOMASON “Jenny’s Gone Away: Songs of Coming and Going in Appalachia”
This multimedia performance will present songs, narratives and images from the long legacy of Appalachia as a place of migrations. Despite it’s long-held representation as a region stuck in time, Appalachia has been witness to many different travelers coming into the region to find work or liberation, and leaving again for the same reasons. Using participatory song “Jenny’s Gone Away” will explore some of these histories- From southern sharecroppers looking for employment in West Virginia coal mines, to Shakers looking for a spiritual Eden in Kentucky and to WWII-era Appalachians looking for opportunities in cities like Detroit and Chicago. Come sing through this performance and learn a thing or two!

Saturday 10-10:45
NuWray Inn Upstairs Parlor
JULIA FRANKSWomen, Witches, and the End of Time:
Julia Franks on the creative process, especially the alchemy of regional history, folklore, personal experience, and current events that contributed to the writing of Over the Plain Houses, her novel set in Western North Carolina in the 1930s, when reformers and government workers streamed into the region.

Saturday 10-10:45
TRAC Gallery
ILLUSTRATORS PANELThe Artist’s Approach to Story
Join three artists who will share images of their work and discuss their use of design and illustration in creating books. Kevin Watson of Press 53, who publishes poetry and short fiction collections, and reprints classic NC novels, will share how he conceptualizes the overall design of his books, from the interior to the cover art. Writer and illustrator Lauren Faulkenberry, who creates artist books through letterpress printing, will discuss ways she creates images through traditional printmaking methods and how they can be translated into digital books. Children’s author Ellie Kirby will share her process of making illustrations and text work together to tell a story. She’ll also describe how she illustrates traditional Appalachian tales with watercolor paintings that feature local scenery and people. Presentations are followed by Q and A.

Saturday 11-11:45
TC Legacy Room
JUBAL TINER Anytown USA — for Writers’ Groups and Fiction Writing Classes
Winesburg, Ohio. Smallville, Kansas,  Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi, Labette, Oklahoma. These fictional locales and many others dot the landscape of literature, film, television, theatre, and even comic books, and their use is akin to the often powerful journey of a “stay-cation.” In this interactive session, Jubal Tiner will facilitate the creation of a fictional town and detail writing possibilities and prompts for writers’ groups or classrooms.

Saturday 11-11:45
Town Hall Upstairs
JAMES McTEER
McTeer will read from his award-winning Lowcountry novel, MINNOW, and offer insight into the inspiration, work, and process that went into its creation and publication. The history, culture, and natural world of the Lowcountry–and his grandfather’s voodoo roots–will also be a topic of discussion. The session will end with an audience-led Q&A.

Saturday 11-11:45
First Baptist Church
PASCKIE PASCUALecture: Translation or Adaptation?
How do we transcribe a cultural truth’s vernacular language in the context of English as a global literary medium of communication.

Saturday 11-11:45
NuWray Inn Upstairs Parlor
JESSICA JACOBS
A reading with Jessica Jacobs from the New Mexico Book Award-winning Pelvis with Distance, a biography-in-poems of Georgia O’Keeffe, and the just-published In Whatever Light is Left to Us, a memoir-in-poems of the joys and difficulties of early marriage.

Saturday 11-11:45
Snap Dragon
BOOK CLUB BUZZ  book buzz photo2016At the Book Buzz we get to rant and rave about the books that we really like and even hate. Book lovers of all stripes and dots can add their two cents to the enthusiastic discussion. What’s not to like about getting the chance to spout out about your favorite books and pick up a few recommendations for more?

 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 10

12-12:30
TOWN CENTER LEGACY ROOM
Book-signing with morning authors and keynote speaker  DAVID GEORGE HASKELL

12:30 – 1:30  Break for lunch

Saturday 1:30- 2:45
TC Legacy Room
PLAYBACK THEATRE
Journeys… the very word inspires stories of Adventure! Discovery! Loss! Reflection! and more….
Playback captures the essence of personal stories through improvised theatre. Using all the performance tools in their backpacks, players listen to experiences shared by audience members and instantly reflect them back. Every kind of story is welcomed—journeys afar and within; journeys that will bring laughter or tears. Playback honors all tellers and all stories.
Come! Be delighted by the stranger’s story that brings insight to your own experience.  Asheville Playback Theatre has had a presence in western NC since 1997, performing thousands of personal stories for two decades, in theaters, school, at conferences, in prisons — wherever people have stories to tell.

Saturday 2-4:45
Advance Registration Required – $30  Sorry–SOLD OUT
POETRY WORKSHOP – NICKOLE BROWN & JESSICA JACOBS
Sponsored by Marilyn Cade/Mountain Farm
Writing Beyond Yourself: The Art & Craft of Persona Poems
“Write what you know:” This most common of writing advice can also be the most confining. So why limit yourself?  After first exploring how writers like Natasha Trethewey, Patricia Smith, and Sharon Olds take on the voices of others in order to speak about the issues most dear to them (looking out to look within), a series of generative prompts will invite you to take on others’ lives and voices, to write from perspectives, time periods, and even genders not your own. Led by Jessica Jacobs, whose collection Pelvis with Distance pushes past the legend of the artist Georgia O’Keeffe to find the woman beneath, and Nickole Brown, whose second collection of poetry, Fanny Says, chronicles the life of her grandmother, this workshop will guide you through the process of imagination and research required to write a life outside your own, giving you a set of solid craft techniques to find the voices of everyone from family members to celebrities.
Sorry–SOLD OUT

Saturday 3-3:45
TC Legacy Room
JIM AUCHMUTEY & CINDY McMAHON – At Long Last, Forgiveness 
Two authors reflect on forgiving what once seemed unforgivable. Cindy Henry McMahon, in her memoir Fresh Water From Old Wells, comes to terms with the memory of her erratic father, sharing a family saga that includes a thwarted lynch mob in Georgia, the integration of Mercer University, the civil rights battles in Birmingham and Selma, and inner-city activism and counter-cultural life in the South.  Jim Auchmutey, in The Class of ’65: A Student, a Divided Town, and the Long Road to Forgiveness, tells the story of a teenage boy who grew up at Koinonia, a Christian farming commune in Georgia that was bombed for its belief in racial equality. Harassed mercilessly in high school, the boy is shocked years later when classmates track him down to apologize. The books actually intersect: Cindy’s family lived at Koinonia in 1965, and they knew Jim’s main character and his family.

Saturday 3-3:45
TC AREA C
LEIGH ANN HENION – A Conversation
Join us for a conversation with Leigh Ann Henion, author of the New York Times bestseller Phenomenal: A Hesitant Adventurer’s Search for Wonder in the Natural World.  In this session, Henion will share the improbable story of how a Washington Post Magazine assignment about the monarch butterfly migration inspired her to chase eclipses, auroras, and other natural phenomena around the globe to reawaken her sense of wonder. Q&A.

Saturday 3-3:45
Town Hall Upstairs
JODI RHODEN – Food and Memoir: a Hands-on Workshop with Cake Lady and Author Jodi Rhoden
Participants will explore memory and metaphor through food and writing with Asheville-based Cake Lady and author of Cake Ladies: Celebrating a Southern Tradition. There will be cake!

Saturday 3-3:45
First Baptist Church
ELLEN MALPHRUS – Untying the Moon (Reading, Discussion, Q&A)
Acclaimed author Ron Rash writes, “Untying the Moon introduces an exciting new voice in Southern fiction. Ellen Malphrus’s kinetic heroine Bailey Martin takes the reader on an eventful, at times bumpy, ride across the continent in a search, ultimately, for the road that leads home.” Join Ellen for a lively discussion of the pull between rootedness and restlessness that many of us feel, along with a sampling of passages from Untying the Moon.

Saturday 3-3:45
TRAC Gallery
JOSEPH MILLS Book Wandering, A Poetry Reading
Joseph Mills will read from several of his poetry collections including Exit, pursued by a bear which consists of poems triggered by Shakespeare stage directions, Sending Christmas Cards to Huck and Hamlet about a life spent moving into and out of books, and This Miraculous Turning which chronicles the journey of being a white born-and-bred Northerner raising black born-and-bred Southerners.

Saturday 4-4:45
TC Legacy Room
BEN MONTGOMERY Lecture, followed by discussion
The Lost Art of the Long Walk: Ben Montgomery, author of Grandma Gatewood’s Walk, discusses the social and physical benefits of walking and what mankind has lost to the modern car-dominant culture.

Saturday 4-4:45
TC Area C
MARIA INGRAM BRAUCHT  Travels Unveiled 
A backwoods bred Kernersville girl listens to the call of gypsies from the bottom of a water well, and grows up to realize that wandering is her passion.  Other worlds, other cultures lured her not as a tourist, but as a pilgrim, infusing those foreign ways into the treasured southern country background of her own.  Her poems take us from home to exotic places and back home again.

Saturday 4-4:45
Town Hall Upstairs
JENNIFER McGAHA Reading and Discussion: Echo in the Mountains
In 2012, after she and her husband lost their Cape Cod home in the country to foreclosure, they moved to an extremely rustic century-old cabin in a wooded NC holler. There, they chopped wood for heat and for hot water. They raised chickens and dairy goats. They made their own soap and cheese, and they planted tomatoes and corn and peppers in the only space sunny enough for a garden – their tin roof. Thus began her journey, both a literal one and a metaphorical one as she struggled to adjust to a way of life that more closely resembled the lives of her Appalachian forebears than any life she’d ever known. McGaha will read excerpts from her memoir-in-progress and discuss the joys and the challenges of writing about family members, both those you love and those you have never known.

Saturday 5-5:30
TOWN CENTER LEGACY ROOM
Book-signing with afternoon authors and keynote speaker DAVID GEORGE HASKELL

____________________

SATURDAY NIGHT

6:30 PM Tickets $20
TOWN CENTER LEGACY ROOM

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DAVID HASKELL KEYNOTE SPEAKER

The Saturday night Keynote is a collaboration with the AMY Regional Library System, a project which is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative, a joint venture of the Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Council, in celebration of the 2016 centennial of the Prize. “Pulitzer NC: The Power of Words, a multifaceted public program presented by the North Carolina Humanities Council, highlights the way Pulitzer Prize-winning journalism, literature, and drama influence our world.

DGHaskell_on_ground

David Haskell‘s work integrates scientific, literary, and contemplative studies of the natural world. His book, The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature
 (http://theforestunseen.com; Viking, 2012), was winner of the National Academy of Sciences’ Best Book Award for 2013, finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction, winner of the 2013 Reed Environmental Writing Award, winner of the 2012 National Outdoor Book Award for Natural History Literature, and runner-up for the 2013 PEN E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. A profile in The New York Times said of Haskell that he “thinks like a biologist, writes like a poet, and gives the natural world the kind of open-minded attention one expects from a Zen monk rather than a hypothesis-driven scientist” (http://ow.ly/ojNZo).  E. O. Wilson wrote that The Forest Unseen was “a new genre of nature writing, located between science and poetry.” Viking will publish Haskell’s next book, Songs of Trees, in 2017.

Haskell holds degrees from the University of Oxford (BA) and from Cornell University (PhD). He is Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies at the University of the South, where he served as Chair of Biology. He is a 2014-2015 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, an Elective Member of the American Ornithologists’ Union, and a Research Associate at Bowdoin College. His scientific research on animal ecology, evolution, and conservation has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the World Wildlife Fund, among others. He serves on the boards and advisory committees of local and national land conservation groups.
Haskell’s classes have received national attention for the innovative ways they combine action in the community with contemplative practice. In 2009, the Carnegie and CASE Foundations named him Professor of the Year for Tennessee, an award given to college professors who have achieved national distinction and whose work shows “extraordinary dedication to undergraduate teaching.” The Oxford American featured him in 2011 as one of the southern U.S.’s most creative teachers. His teaching has been profiled in USA Today, The Tennesseean, and other newspapers.
PLEASE NOTE: Doors open at 6pm Saturday for the 6:30 Haskell event.  If possible, please come to the Registration Desk any time Friday or Saturday between 9am and 5pm to pick up your wristband “ticket” rather than stand in line at the door.  We recommend you put it on as soon as you get it; if you lose it, your “ticket” is gone. They are Tyvek and very sturdy.  There is no “waiting list” for potentially available seats – sorry.