Schedule

PLEASE NOTE:  The schedule is subject to (and probably will) change.   A link to a printable schedule will be posted shortly before the festival starts.  Stay tuned!

THURSDAY NIGHT September 7th  7:30 pm

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
SONGCATCHING – Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the North Carolina Arts Council
Old Ways and New Ways with Bruce Greene, Shelby Stephenson and Friends:
Tim Babb, Tim Clark, Rob Levin, koreloy mcwhirter, Jay Ponton, Minnie Powell, Ron Powell, John D. Richards, Susan Scoggins, Cathy Larson Sky, and Roberta Whiteside

Our 12th annual festival begins with a musical journey featuring the imagination and creativity of the American spirit.  Americans were searching for a cultural identity in the 19th century, something that was truly American and would not reflect their European roots as much.  Because we were a society of immigrants, by choice, birth, or force, the influence of all these cultures eventually came together to form America’s music.  And because it happened freely, there was no plan, nor real process. These local professional musicians, whose styles include blues, ballads, tin pan alley, country, rock, gospel, will thread together our American musical experience, and ask you to join in!


FRIDAY MORNING September 8th  9:00-11:45

FICTION WORKSHOP with LUCY CORIN
Making the Tiny Enormous
When I wrote my series of one hundred apocalypse stories, I gave myself a writerly task: how can I take any little idea or line from my notebook and turn it into an “apocalypse” as quickly as possible?  Another way to say this: how can I write a story that is as short as possible in order to create an impact that is as large as possible?  Using tactics of both compression and metaphoric reach, borrowing techiques from both prose and poetry, we’ll work with material that you contribute in order make it as powerful as it can be in as short a space as possible.
Bring to workshop 13 copies of a piece of fiction, memoir, or prose-poetry that is no more than 2 double-spaced pages (use a plain 12 point font).   Upon registering, you will be given Lucy’s email, as you will also need to send it (in MS Word — not PDF) to Lucy, because we will be revising pieces “live” in our session.  That means you should choose something that you feel some attachment or affection for– a piece of writing that you care about — but something that you are willing to play with and to let other people play with, so that you can learn from the experience ways you might revise it on your own.
ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $30 Class size limit 12


FRIDAY MORNING September 8th  9-9:45

JAYE ROBIN BROWN
When I Grow Up I Want to Be a Writer
Town Center Legacy Room
In this session, YA author Jaye Robin Brown talks about what it takes to go from your English classroom in high school to the book shelf at Barnes & Noble.  (*Spoiler Alert* It does not involve magic – okay, maybe a little) Talk, followed by Q&A

CAT PLESKA
“They’re Going to Hate Me; I Just Know It: the perils of writing about others”
Burnsville Town Hall
In this discussion, we tackle writing about family, friends, colleagues, fellow travelers on this planet—everyone who is part of our lives.  How do we tackle including them in our memoir without causing anger, recrimination, law suits, plus cope with the fear of writing fairly and honestly about each one?  In my memoir, I wrote about an alcoholic father, a depressed mother, and old boyfriends.  Oh Boy! Let’s talk about how to approach inclusion and how to navigate what sometimes feels like a mine field.


FRIDAY MORNING September 8th  10-10:45

JAYE ROBIN BROWN
When I Grow Up I Want to Be a Writer
Town Center Legacy Room
(See 9:00 description)

J. DREW LANHAM
Wandering Towards Home– Why Personal Story Matters in the Connection between Culture and Conservation
Burnsville Town Hall

JEREMY B. JONES
Memoir of Place
First Baptist Church
Jones will share from his book Bearwallow and talk about the process of writing a memoir about a changing place, his family’s home in Fruitland, NC.  He will discuss ways to broaden a memoir into the past, the landscape, and the culture of a place while still telling a personal story.

HANNAH PALMER
Stories in the Landscape: The Intersection of Creative Writing and Urban Design
TRAC Gallery
What are the myths we preserve when a place has changed?  What stories do we document in the landscape?  What are the fictions we write while designing a future building, block or neighborhood?  As a creative writer working with urban planners, Hannah Palmer noticed that these two worlds don’t often regard each other, but should.  She’ll discuss how her work as a writer led to a career in urban design, and how a deep understanding of place of fuels the most creative and personal writing.

ANNE MAREN-HOGAN/JEANNE JULIAN
The Charms and Challenges of the Chapbook: Readings and Reflections
Galaxy Arts
Hear from two poets whose chapbooks have won the annual Longleaf Press Chapbook Contest.  Anne and Jeanne each will speak briefly about the decisions entailed in the creation of this shorter book form.  As they alternately read from their work, they will also share their reflections on how nature has influenced their subject matter (in old ways and in new): the cycles of the seasons, and the regenerative power of flora, fauna, and landscape.  Questions will be welcome.

MIMI SCHLESINGER ORMOND
Kindertransport: A Rescued Child – Lecture, Discussion, and Q&A
Yummi Yarns
The story begins in Ormond’s idyllic childhood home of Marienbad, Czechoslovakia, which abruptly changed with the invasion of the Nazis.  It is a story of how she was rescued by Nicholas Winton who organized the Kindertransport to save the Czech children.  The story ends with her meeting Edward Ormond, an American soldier, getting married and coming to America.


FRIDAY MORNING September 8th  11-11:45

JAMES RESTON
Town Center Legacy Room

J. DREW LANHAM
Wandering Towards Home– Why Personal Story Matters in the Connection between Culture and Conservation
Burnsville Town Hall

SHELBY STEPHENSON
Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the NC Arts Council
A Reading, Some Music
First Baptist Church

MARJORIE HUDSON
Mosaic Writing
Galaxy Arts
Marjorie Hudson thought she was writing a history book when she took on the subject of Virginia Dare and the Lost Colony in Searching for Virginia Dare.  Instead, the haunting subject, full of missing children, grieving fathers, lost nations of Native Americans, and 400 years of legends, inspired her to draw on her fiction, poetry, and memoir writing skills to tell the story.  In this program, Hudson reads from her book and talks about her decision-making process as a writer and researcher. She also discusses how to use text fragments and voice as tile and grout to make a mosaic that creates a satisfying whole picture.  Bring a pen and paper on a clipboard for a writing exercise to try out this technique.
This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Arts.

CRYSTAL WILKINSON

TBA

TRAC Gallery


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th  12:00 noon

Town Center Legacy Room

Book Signing with all Friday morning authors


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th    2:00-4:45

Poetry Workshop with ADRIAN RICE
LONG STORY SHORT: HARNESSING HAIKU
Join Belfast poet, and long-term Hickory resident, Adrian Rice for a workshop celebrating all things haiku!  Participants will get the chance to read and learn from old and new masters of this short-form craft, and will be gently invited to pen their own ‘wee’ gems.   Participants will also be especially encouraged to harness their haiku to form an autobiographical or narrative sequence – to make a long story short.  Adrian himself is the author of a critically acclaimed sequence entitled Hickory Haiku, which he will also discuss and share as a suitable prompt for this exciting workshop. ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $30 Class size limit 12


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th   2:00-2:45

BROCK ADAMS
Apocalypse Now: Writing About the End of the World
Burnsville Town Hall
There are a million ways the world might end, and writers seem intent on exploring every one of them. Why are we so fascinated with apocalyptic fiction? What can the genre say about us—our society, our culture, our hopes and dreams? What can readers learn from apocalyptic literature, and how can writers use the genre as a tool to examine universal human themes? Brock Adams leads a discussion that examines these questions and more in relation to his novel, Ember, and other contemporary works.

GRACE C. OCASIO
My Name is Grace: I Like to Write
TRAC Gallery
Featuring some reflections on autobiographical events of my past and present juxtaposed against the poems that crystallize those reflections. A sense of place is pertinent to the poems I will present.  For former New Yorkers, my early work will resonate most with them.  For native North Carolinians, my latest work will attract them as I draw from my family history to reveal the distinct traits of pivotal family members who visited or lived in North Carolina at some point in their lives.  Those fascinated with celebrities will find most intriguing my intermediate work focusing on figures like Janis Joplin, Audrey Hepburn, and Greta Garbo.  With these poems, I detail the unique aspects of these famous artists’ lives, foregrounding their traits that have made them most memorable to several generations of music and movie lovers.

LUCY CORIN
Yummi Yarns
Lucy will read from her most recent book of stories, One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses, which will lead into Q& A about the apocalyptic in daily American life. She’ll read a series of very short fictions from the book– pieces that are between one line and three pages– some fantastical, some lyrical, some irreverent, some brutal, each exploring something different about the apocalyptic.


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th   3:00-3:45

MARK ESSIG
The Miraculous Pig from Ancient Israel to Appalachia
Town Center Legacy Room
Unlike other barnyard animals—which pull plows, give eggs or milk, or grow wool—a pig produces only one thing: meat. Incredibly efficient at converting almost any organic matter into nourishing, delectable protein, swine are nothing short of a gastronomic godsend—yet their flesh is banned in many cultures, and the animals themselves are maligned as filthy brutes. Pork has long been a staple of the human diet, prized in societies from Ancient Rome to dynastic China to the contemporary American South. In the nineteenth century Appalachian farmers turned their hogs loose in the woods to gorge on acorns and chestnuts, then rounded them up and drove them to market in the lowland South. (In fact, reading about the enormous hog drives of the pre-Civil War South is what first inspired Essig to write this book.) Despite the animal’s many virtues, its willingness to eat a wide range of substances (some of them distinctly unpalatable to humans) has led people throughout history to demonize the entire species. Tracing the interplay of pig biology and human culture from Neolithic villages 10,000 years ago to modern industrial farms, Essig blends culinary and natural history to trace the surprising history of the pig.

JOHN LANE
Finding Stories in Your Own Backyard: A Nonfiction Mini-Workshop
First Baptist Church

BOOK BUZZ
Galaxy Arts
Book Buzz sessions provide you with a safe space to rave, rant, or both, about your reading experiences.  We all want to know about your stinkers as well as your stellars.  Tell us stories about your book clubs. Tell us about under- and over-whelming reads.  Tell us about books that enlighten, intrigue, amuse, or widen your horizons.  Tell us about books that bore, disturb, alienate, irritate, or frighten you.  We gather together to hear it all!  Take notes!  This information is valuable stuff!  The session goes fast, and is usually quite entertaining.

JUBAL TINER
Jubal Tiner reads “Ursa Major”
Burnsville Town Hall
A desperate father tries multiple ways, traditional and not, to soothe his unceasingly crying daughter, including a trip to a deserted mill, advice from a midnight butcher and an encounter with a bear. All this and more swirls together to make this mysterious, haunting, funny and life-affirming short story. Tiner will read, discuss questions and answers, and talk about this story’s unlikely path to publication. Drawing for a door prize included.


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th   4:00-4:45

CAT PLESKA
“Seeking Audiences: how to discover diverse subjects to discuss/explore/share your writing”
Burnsville Town Hall
One day, I was hired to read and discuss my memoir with a large, unknown group. My job was to not only tell the story of the book, but also to find ways to connect with a diverse audience. Since not everyone there was an only child raised in a challenging family in rural and urban Appalachia, what could I talk about? I discovered several ideas within my text to develop talks about subjects I didn’t realize was in my story. It turned out to be great fun and a learning experience for me as well as my listeners.

RAY MCMANUS
A Reading
First Baptist Church

BRIDGETTE A. LACY & SUSI GOTT SÉGURET

Conversation About Food – A Literary Feast: Dishing up Culture, Geography & Identity, Then & Now
Galaxy Arts
Food writers and cookbook authors Bridgette A. Lacy (Sunday Dinner) and Susi Gott Séguret (Appalachian Appetites) will explore the sacredness of taking the time to be with the people who fill our lives. They will offer ideas on creating an atmosphere of welcome as well as dishes that nourish the soul. The authors share tips that will create a fertile setting that blends the past with the present in ways that both heal and inspire.


FRIDAY AFTERNOON September 8th   5:00-5:30

Town Center Legacy Room

Book Signing with all Friday afternoon authors


FRIDAY EVENING September 8th  7:00

BANQUET with RONNI LUNDY

Lundy is the author of Victuals: An Appalachian Journey, with Recipes, winner of the 2017 James Beard Cookbook of the Year and Best Book of the Year Awards.

Ronni’s other nine books, include Shuck Beans, Stack Cakes and Honest Fried Chicken (Atlantic, 1990), named by Gourmet as one of the six essential cookbooks on Southern food, and Sorghum’s Savor, (University Press of Florida, 2015). Lundy was also the editor of Cornbread Nation 3: Foods of the Mountain South. (University of North Carolina Press, 2005).

A founding member of the Southern Foodways Alliance, she is a former board member and recipient of that organization’s Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award recognizing her work as a writer covering both food and music. She has served as writer and/or editor at newspapers (Louisville Times/Courier Journal), magazines (Gourmet, Esquire, Eating Well, The Zenchilada, Louisville) and as editor at Lark Books.  She is a frequent reader for university presses including Kentucky, North Carolina, Illinois, Mississippi and Chicago.  She has focused on foodways, music, ritual and memory.

Lundy is also a founder of the Appalachian Food Summit.  In addition to the James Beard Awards, her work has received awards from the International Association of Culinary Professionals, Association of Food Journalists, and Kentucky’s Sigma Delta Chi.

Born in Corbin, Kentucky and raised in Louisville with strong ties to the mountains, she often writes from the perspective and about the experience of the Appalachian diaspora. She is happy to find herself in her beloved mountains again as a present resident of Burnsville.

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $35 B.Y.O.B.


SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 9th   8:30-12:45

Altered Books Workshop with DEANA BLANCHARD and PATTI McCALL
Altered Books: Turn an old, unwanted book into a work of art
Part biblio-vandalism, part mixed-media collage, and part scrap-booking, the craft of altered books is becoming increasingly popular and recognized as a distinct art form.  But what exactly is an altered book? According to the International Society of Altered Book Artists (alteredbookartists.com), it’s “any book, old or new, that has been recycled by creative means into a work of art.  They can be painted, cut, burned, folded, added to, collaged in, gold-leafed, rubber stamped, drilled, or otherwise adorned…”
For our 4-hour altered book workshop we will have prepared the book for you by gluing the pages together and cutting a niche in the first pages to give some dimension.

What to bring: photos – especially old ones, small twigs, old jewelry to take apart, pretty papers, mixed media ephemera, tiny shells, old lace, fabric scraps, letters…  Bring a snack, too.

We will provide glue, tiny glass hearts, mixed media stuff, ideas, papers, stamps, many materials too numerous to mention.

Online resource: https://www.pinterest.com/deanathequeena/altered-books/   We suggest you start from the bottom of the page and go up to study these images. You could also go to YouTube to see altered book tutorials, but keep in mind that we already have the book glued and a niche cut into the first page….
Workshop fee includes our cost for the already-glued book and our ephemera that you might select.   Ticketed participants will board a spiffy Yancey Transportation van at 8:30 sharp at the Burnsville Town Square near the Snap Dragon for a ride to the Selena Glass & Metal studio.  Come early so you don’t miss the bus!
ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $45 Class size limit 8


SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER  9th   9:00- 11:45

Memoir Workshop with CAT PLESKA
Journey from Night into Day: Beginning, Continuing and Deepening Your Memoir
Many know how to begin a memoir, but sometimes we ask ourselves what comes next? How do we continue? We keep writing, but eventually we want to know how to deepen the story so that we recognize themes, ideas, and universality to enrich our own life story and to reach out to our readers. In this workshop, attendees will write to prompts to begin the journey, then further an idea to the next level of development and then finally finding within the piece a spark of light that allows us to follow it home.  ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $30 Class size limit 15


SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER  9th    9:00-9:45

Book Buzz
homeplace beer co.
Book Buzz sessions provide you with a safe space to rave, rant, or both, about your reading experiences.  We all want to know about your stinkers as well as your stellars.  Tell us stories about your book clubs. Tell us about under- and over-whelming reads.  Tell us about books that enlighten, intrigue, amuse, or widen your horizons.  Tell us about books that bore, disturb, alienate, irritate, or frighten you.  We gather together to hear it all!  Take notes!  This information is valuable stuff!  The hour goes fast, and is usually quite entertaining.

JUBAL TINER
Yummi Yarns
Anytown, USA:  Winesburg, OH. Castlerock, ME. East Egg and West Egg, NY. Zebulon County, IA. Labette, OK. What do all these towns have in common? They are all fictional! In this interactive session, Jubal Tiner will lead participants in creating fictional towns or cities, imagining locales in and around the urban or rural setting, and peopling them with interesting and evocative denizens. A new way for writer’s’ groups to use traditional tools to create a town from which to write! Door prizes, too!


SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 9th   10:00-10:45

BROCK ADAMS
The Crumbling Wall: The Merging of Literary and Genre Fiction
Town Center Legacy Room
It was once common to divide fiction into two broad categories: literary fiction and genre. The wall between the two was tall and sturdy, with Toni Morrison on one side and Danielle Steel on the other. Today, the wall is crumbling as writers such as Colson Whitehead and Margaret Atwood create fiction that blends and transcends categories. Brock Adams leads a discussion that examines the increasingly-blurry line between the literary and the genre with a focus on his novel Ember among other contemporary works.

HANNAH PALMER
Stories in the Landscape: The Intersection of Creative Writing and Urban Design
TRAC Gallery
What are the myths we preserve when a place has changed? What stories do we document in the landscape? What are the fictions we write while designing a future building, block or neighborhood? As a creative writer working with urban planners, Hannah Palmer noticed that these two worlds don’t often regard each other, but should. She’ll discuss how her work as a writer led to a career in urban design, and how a deep understanding of place of fuels the most creative and personal writing.

JEREMY B. JONES
Family Stories to Novel
homeplace beer co.
Jeremy B. Jones, author of Bearwallow, will read from and talk about his current book project, a novel loosely based on the lives of his grandparents, who were adoptive siblings and displaced from Cataloochee in the 1920s. He will discuss the possibilities and pitfalls of using family history as a launchpad for fiction.

MIMI SCHLESINGER ORMOND
Kindertransport: A Rescued Child – Lecture, Discussion, and Q&A
Yummi Yarns
The story begins in Ormond’s idyllic childhood home of Marienbad, Czechoslovakia, which abruptly changed with the invasion of the Nazis. It is a story of how she was rescued by Nicholas Winton who organized the kindertransport to save the Czech children. The story ends with her meeting Edward Ormond, an American soldier, getting married and coming to America.


SATURDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 9th   11:00-11:45

ANN B. ROSS
How I Get Ideas for the Miss Julia Stories – Reading, Q&A
Town Center Legacy Room

GRACE C. OCASIO
My Name is Grace: I Like to Write
First Baptist Church
Featuring some reflections on autobiographical events of my past and present juxtaposed against the poems that crystallize those reflections. A sense of place is pertinent to the poems I will present.  For former New Yorkers, my early work will resonate most with them.  For native North Carolinians, my latest work will attract them as I draw from my family history to reveal the distinct traits of pivotal family members who visited or lived in North Carolina at some point in their lives.  Those fascinated with celebrities will find most intriguing my intermediate work focusing on figures like Janis Joplin, Audrey Hepburn, and Greta Garbo.  With these poems, I detail the unique aspects of these famous artists’ lives, foregrounding their traits that have made them most memorable to several generations of music and movie lovers.

ANNE MAREN-HOGAN/JEANNE JULIAN
The Charms and Challenges of the Chapbook: Readings and Reflections
Galaxy Arts
Hear from two poets whose chapbooks have won the annual Longleaf Press Chapbook Contest. Anne and Jeanne each will speak briefly about the decisions entailed in the creation of this shorter book form. As they alternately read from their work, they will also share their reflections on how nature has influenced their subject matter (in old ways and in new): the cycles of the seasons, and the regenerative power of flora, fauna, and landscape. Questions will be welcome.

RAY MCMANUS
A Reading
homeplace beer co.

CRYSTAL WILKINSON

TBA

TRAC Gallery


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th 12:00 noon

Town Center Legacy Room

Book Signing with all Saturday morning authors


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th   2:00-4:45

Workshop with JAYE ROBIN BROWN
Y/A Writing for Middle Grade and Young Adults in Three Acts
Like a good story, writing has a beginning, a middle, and an end. In this workshop we’ll talk about ways to approach writing for the middle grade and young adult audience, including resources both online and in-person and how they can add value to your pursuit of publication. We’ll discuss the basics of crafting a young adult (or middle grade) novel, ways you get those words on the page, and how to keep going when it seems like your words are bleeding. And finally, what does it take to get that beautiful draft from your computer into the hands of readers, in other words, the publication process. This workshop is geared more toward traditional publishing than self-publishing, but we can certainly touch on both. There will be writing exercises scattered throughout, so please bring your favorite writing device and all of your questions. And though it will be geared more toward those new to the kidlit world, there should be tidbits for every level of writer.  ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $30 Class size limit 14


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th  2:00-2:45

BRUCE GREENE
Traditional Music of the Southern Appalachians: Keeping the Past Alive in the 21st Century
Town Center Legacy Room
Traditional fiddle tunes and songs were kept alive for generations almost entirely by word of mouth.  Bruce will perform examples of these and talk about how they have been a means of passing on history, legends, and stories – without relying on the written word!


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th  3:00-3:45

Conversation About Food – A Literary Feast: Dishing up Culture, Geography & Identity, Then & Now
BRIDGETTE A. LACY & SUSI GOTT SÉGURET
Town Center Legacy Room
Food writers and cookbook authors Susi Gott Séguret and Bridgette A. Lacy talk about how food becomes fodder for literary endeavors. Everyone eats but not everyone can transport readers from the plate to the page. Séguret, author of Appalachian Appetites, and Lacy, author of Sunday Dinner, reveal how food and foodways inform memory and relationships. Whether you are from Appalachia or the Blue Ridge Mountains, food writing is a universal language that transcends time, culture, geography and identity. The authors will discuss how to add food writing flavor and spice to your prose.

SHELBY STEPHENSON
A Reading, Some Music
Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the NC Arts Council
First Baptist Church

LUCY CORIN
Reading, Q&A
TRAC Gallery
Lucy will read from one of the long stories in her recent book, One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses, and take questions about writing fiction that is influenced by both literary realism and fantastical traditions, that is both deeply personal and obsessively imagined.

ADRIAN RICE
Poetry and Place: From Belfast to Hickory with poet Adrian Rice
Yummi Yarns


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th   4:00-4:45

MARJORIE HUDSON
Accidental Birds-Stories about Coming Home
First Baptist Church
Marjorie Hudson weaves selections from her mesmerizing stories in Accidental Birds of the Carolinas with tales of the real places and people who inspired them. Her writing journey is one of a Yankee discovering the South, and ultimately being transformed by her love for it.  “Hudson writes with great insight and wisdom,” Jill McCorkle says, “leaving  the reader both heartbroken and uplifted.”  Accidental Birds of the Carolinas has been recognized by the Hemingway Foundation, the Ucross Foundation, the Pen Hemingway Awards for First Fiction, and the Novello First Fiction Prize, among others.  Be prepared to laugh and be moved in equal measure.  After the talk, she will keep reading her stories to you if you bring her a glass of wine.

JOHN LANE
Finding Stories in Your Own Backyard: A Nonfiction Mini-Workshop
TRAC Gallery

ADRIAN RICE
Poetry and Place: From Belfast to Hickory with poet Adrian Rice
Yummi Yarns

MARK ESSIG
The Miraculous Pig from Ancient Israel to Appalachia
Galaxy Arts
Unlike other barnyard animals—which pull plows, give eggs or milk, or grow wool—a pig produces only one thing: meat. Incredibly efficient at converting almost any organic matter into nourishing, delectable protein, swine are nothing short of a gastronomic godsend—yet their flesh is banned in many cultures, and the animals themselves are maligned as filthy brutes. Pork has long been a staple of the human diet, prized in societies from Ancient Rome to dynastic China to the contemporary American South. In the nineteenth century Appalachian farmers turned their hogs loose in the woods to gorge on acorns and chestnuts, then rounded them up and drove them to market in the lowland South. (In fact, reading about the enormous hog drives of the pre-Civil War South is what first inspired Essig to write this book.) Despite the animal’s many virtues, its willingness to eat a wide range of substances (some of them distinctly unpalatable to humans) has led people throughout history to demonize the entire species. Tracing the interplay of pig biology and human culture from Neolithic villages 10,000 years ago to modern industrial farms, Essig blends culinary and natural history to trace the surprising history of the pig.


SATURDAY AFTERNOON SEPTEMBER 9th  5:00-5:30

Town Center Legacy Room

Book Signing with all Saturday afternoon authors


SATURDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 9TH 6:30

JAMES RESTON, JR.
2017 Keynote Speaker

James Reston’s newest book, A Rift in the Earth:Art, Memory and the Fight For A Vietnam War Memorial  will be released on September 9th ! Author of 17 books, three plays, and numerous articles in national magazines. Winner of Prix Italia and the Dupont-Columbia Award for his chilling 1983 ninety-minute radio documentary on National Public Radio, “Father Cares: the Last of Jonestown.” His last six historical works, Galileo: A Life, The Last Apocalypse, Warriors of God, Dogs of God, and Defenders of the Faith and Luther’s Fortress have been translated into thirteen foreign languages. Warriors of God, The Innocence of Joan Little, and Collision at Home Plate have been optioned by Hollywood. The Last Apocalypse was a main selection of the Book of the Month Club. Warriors of God is an international best seller with over 200,000 copies sold world-wide and still selling. Fragile Innocence, his memoir of bringing up his handicapped daughter, reached #8 on the Washington Post best seller list. Member, Authors Guild of America.

In 1976-1977, Reston was David Frost’s Watergate adviser for the famous Frost/​Nixon Interviews, seen by 57 million people world-wide. His narrative of that experience was published in 2007 and entitled The Conviction of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/​Nixon Interviews and was the main inspiration to the British playwright, Peter Morgan, in the making of his hit London play, “Frost/​Nixon.” Reston is a major character and the narrator of the play. In the Hollywood adaptation of the play, directed by Ron Howard,and nominated for five Academy Awards, Reston is played by the actor, Sam Rockwell.

His articles have appeared in the New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Time, The New York Times Magazine, Smithsonian, National Geographic, Esquire, American Theatre, Playboy, and Rolling Stone.  He recently contributed the Foreword to the National Geographic book, Eyewitness to History.

His three plays are: “Sherman the Peacemaker,” Chapel Hill, N.C., 1979 & 2015; “Jonestown Express,” Providence, R.I., 1983; and “Galileo’s Torch,” Flint Hill, Va., 2014.  Member, Dramatists Guild of America

He has lectured widely in the United States (Smithsonian, Library of Congress, Woodrow Wilson Center) and overseas on the millennium, the crusades, the Spanish Inquisition, the Ottomans at Vienna, citing their relevance to modern issues…..and about the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 2014.

He has been a fellow at the American Academy in Rome,a fellow at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress and a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington.

Born in New York in 1941, he was raised in Washington, D.C. and attended the University of North Carolina on a Morehead Scholarship where he earned his B.A. in philosophy.  At UNC he was an All South soccer player and after forty-two years still holds the single game scoring record for the university (5 goals against N.C. State, October 18, 1962).  He attended Oxford University for his junior year.

Reston was an assistant to U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Steward Udall, 1964-65. U.S. Army, 1965-68.  Lecturer in Creative Writing, University of North Carolina, 1971-81.  Newsweek, PBS, and BBC candidate to be the first writer on the NASA space shuttle.  Married, with three children.  Lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED $20